The hit series “American Gods” will start its Season 3 run on January 10th. The release date, a Lakeside Clunker Board, and a message to fans was released on Neil Gaiman’s social media pages on Tuesday morning, giving fans a date to circle on their calendars.

Gaiman wrote the original novels that the show is based on, and serves as creator and executive producer on the project. You can find a collection of Gaiman’s work right here on Amazon.

“The struggles of the gods and the people in Season 3 of ‘American Gods’ are the struggles of America,” Gaiman told fans. “We didn’t think it would prove as timely when we plotted it, nor did I think the novel would still be relevant when I wrote it over 20 years ago. But I’m glad it’s happening now, in a year when it feels as though diverse stories are being heard, and honored, and allowed to change the future.”

The show’s description reads, “Starring Ricky Whittle as Shadow Moon and Ian McShane as Mr. Wednesday, “American Gods” is a one-hour drama adapted from Neil Gaiman’s best-selling novel about a war brewing between Old Gods and New Gods: the traditional gods of mythological roots from around the world steadily losing believers to an upstart pantheon of gods reflecting society’s modern love of money, technology, media, celebrity and drugs.”

The series also features Emily Browning, Yetide Badaki, Bruce Langley, Omid Abtahi, Ashley Reyes, Crispin Glover, Demore Barnes, Devery Jacobs, Blythe Danner, Marilyn Manson, Julia Sweeney, Iwan Rheon, Danny Trejo, Peter Stormare, Denis O’Hare, Lela Loren, Dominique Jackson, Wale, Herizen Guardiola, and Eric Johnson.

Starz added, “We were forged in God’s image, but the Gods are also made in ours — and in Season Two the battle moves inexorably toward crisis point as the destinies of gods and men collide. While Mr. World plots revenge for the attack against him in Season One, Shadow throws in his lot with Wednesday’s attempt to convince the Old Gods of the case for full-out war, with Laura and Mad Sweeney in tow. A council at the House on the Rock explodes into chaos, sending deities both Old and New on quests across America that will converge on Cairo, Illinois: forcing Shadow to carve out a place as a believer in this strange new world of living gods — a dark world where change demands commitment, and faith requires terrible sacrifice.”

Gaiman’s full letter to fans on social media reads:

When we embarked upon making Season 3 of “American Gods,” we had no idea how timely it would turn out to be. We knew we wanted to return to what people loved and responded to in the book: that it was time for Shadow to go to the little town of Lakeside and try to lose himself in normality.

And at the same time, in Season 3, we wanted to focus on the characters and their journeys. To show Shadow forging a path guided by the Gods of his ancestors, becoming more himself while deciding who he is and what side he’s on — humanity’s or that of the Gods.

We knew also that we wanted to continue to root the show in the landscapes of America. To explore what “America” means to its people and to talk about immigrants — about the very different people who came to this remarkable land and brought their gods with them. The new gods of phone and app and glitter demand our attention and our love, and the old gods want to mean something again,

America must be for all of us, and “American Gods” must reflect that. This season truly feels as if it does. It’s full of drama and emotion, the very real and the utterly strange, and it features some of the finest performances the show has yet seen. It brings back favorite characters, some in remarkable new ways, and we will encounter people and gods we’ve never met before. I’m proud of our brilliant cast — of Ricky and Emily, of Yetide and Ian, Bruce, Demore, Omid and all the rest — and of what the writers have done to bring the story back on track.

The struggles of the gods and the people in Season 3 of “American Gods” are the struggles of America. We didn’t think it would prove as timely when we plotted it, nor did I think the novel would still be relevant when I wrote it over 20 years ago. But I’m glad it’s happening now, in a year when it feels as though diverse stories are being heard, and honored, and allowed to change the future.

Subscribe to Daily Updates and never miss a headline.

Slanted sometimes uses affiliate links and may earn a commission if you purchase items through those links.