Celebrity

Everyone should love the new Kristen Stewart

We love the new Kristen Stewart and it’s getting pretty hard to find anyone that doesn’t. Over the last few years she has become an award-winning actor and a champion of independent-films.

Her desision to ditch the glamour of big-Hollywood production and joining more meaningful indie-projects did wonders for the actor’s career and her work been wowing audiences at film-festivals for the last few years. It’s a big change from the Kristen Stewart of the past and the actor seems to enjoy the newer transformation of her former-self.

Stewart’s last few roles have all been fantastic choices, loved by many critics and fans around the world. Stewart’s latest films include “Camp X-Ray,” “Still Alice,” and her Cesar-winning role in “Clouds of Sils Maria.” All of which turned out wonderfully for the actor.

In a new interview with Marie Claire, Stewart talked about the changes in her life, and one of the first thing the actor let go of, was apologizing to everyone.

“I’ve been doing less of the ‘I’m sooooo sorry.’ And more of the ‘No. F-ck. Jesus,’” Kristen explained in an interview with Marie Claire.

The actor took the cover and cover-story in the upcoming August edition of the magazine. The interview touches on a lot of the key events that dragged Stewart’s name threw the mud in her post-Twilight days. “I lit my universe on fire and I watched it burn,” she said plainly.

“Speaking very candidly, it was a really traumatic period in my early 20s that kick-started something in me that was a bit more feral … I’m really proud that I am able to move forward and not fall into every mental crater.” Stewart then added, “That’s a new thing for me. Age has made me smarter and calmer. And it is f-cking awesome.”

“I was constantly anxious,” Stewart said in the interview while reflecting on her early days in Hollywood. “I was kind of a control freak. If I didn’t know how something was going to turn out, I would make myself ill, or just be locked up or inhibited in a way that was really debilitating.”