Technology

Google announces Project Fi, its own mobile network solution

It appears that the early speculation and rumors were true, Google has taken its first steps into becoming a mobile carrier all its own. The company has announced ‘Fi,’ a new stage for Google in which it hopes to offer wireless connectivity and simple communication for users of its own hardware.

“Project Fi enables us to work in close partnership with leading carriers, hardware makers, and all of you to push the boundaries of what’s possible,” explains the company in today’s announcement. “By designing across hardware, software and connectivity, we can more fully explore new ways for people to connect and communicate. Two of the top mobile networks in the U.S.—Sprint and T-Mobile—are partnering with us to launch Project Fi.”

The idea behind Project Fi is to keep you connected, no matter where you are in the world, even if that means hopping networks along the way. Depending on your location, the best network could be a local Wi-Fi hotspot or a popular 4G LTE network and Google will help you decide which one is better for your connection.

“We developed new technology that gives you better coverage by intelligently connecting you to the fastest available network at your location whether it’s Wi-Fi or one of our two partner LTE networks.”

Google will also secure your data through encryption according to today’s announcement. If you start a call on Wi-Fi coverage in your house, it will seamlessly transition from Wi-Fi to cell networks without any issue, if everything goes according to plan that is.

The project also hopes to unite all screens and devices, having phone number live “in the cloud,” as Google describes, this will allow users to talk or text on just about any phone, tablet or laptop. It’s the same idea as Apple’s iMessage, but that does have some limitations.

“We offer one simple plan at one price with 24/7 support. Here’s how it works: for $20 a month you get all the basics (talk, text, Wi-Fi tethering, and international coverage in 120+ countries), and then it’s a flat $10 per GB for cellular data while in the U.S. and abroad. 1GB is $10/month, 2GB is $20/month, 3GB is $30/month, and so on. Since it’s hard to predict your data usage, you’ll get credit for the full value of your unused data. Let’s say you go with 3GB for $30 and only use 1.4GB one month. You’ll get $16 back, so you only pay for what you use.”

more info: google