Books

Book claims to know the identity of Jack the Ripper through DNA

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It’s a mystery that has been the center of a dozen films, just as many books and part of the very culture that defines London, now a new book claims to have identified the man behind the name ‘Jack the Ripper’.

The book is set to release later this week and it’s called simply ‘Naming Jack The Ripper,’ and the author claims to have finally tracked down the serial killer’s name and backstory. All of this was done by collecting DNA analysis, this according to the author.

The new book names Jack the Ripper as Aaron Kosminski, a Polish immigrant that travelled to London in the early 1880s. Why was he never found? If the story is accurate, that could be because Kosminski was eventually committed to an insane asylum where he was forgotten and out of sight from the law.

Jack the Ripper is attached to at least five murders in London in the year 1888, but no one knows for certain who the actual killer was. Russell Edwards is the author of the book, who used a shawl found during the original investigations that included blood and semen stains.

Edwards wrote in an article for The Mail On Sunday, “By 2007, I felt I had exhausted all avenues until I read a newspaper article about the sale of a shawl connected to the Ripper case.” He then continued, “Its owner, David Melville-Hayes, believed it had been in his family‚Äôs possession since the murder of Catherine Eddowes, when his ancestor, Acting Sergeant Amos Simpson, asked his superiors if he could take it home to give to his wife, a dressmaker. Incredibly, it was stowed without ever being washed, and was handed down…”

Jari Louhelainen is a molecular biology professor that analyzed the DNA samples from the shawl, and compared it to a DNA sample from a descendant of Kosminski’s sister.

“The first strand of DNA showed a 99.2% match, as the analysis instrument could not determine the sequence of the missing 0.8 per cent fragment of DNA,” Louhelainen wrote in the Mail On Sunday article. “On testing the second strand, we achieved a perfect 100% match.”

more info: amazon.com/NamingJacktheRipper